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Travel and Leisure

Where to Go When Touring in the UK?

When thinking of going to Europe, not including the UK in your stop is a missed fortune of witnessing one of the world’s most incredible places. All across the country, it is filled to the brim with some of the greatest places to go to in England.

 

The country’s allure has much to do with its diverse scenery and rich cultural heritage. The best places to see include everything from beautifully preserved nation estates and castles to its numerous world-class art museums and galleries. You can rely on British airport transfers to get you everywhere in no time.  

 

To help you decide, here’s a list of places you would want to cross off your list:

 

London

 

London has something for everyone. Admirers of artwork or theatre will praise the National Gallery along with also the West End Theatre District, while fans of the monarchy can’t bypass Buckingham Palace.   

 

Attracting 27 million visitors each year, London is the most visited town in Europe. It’s not surprising that London is high in numerous people’s travel programs: the city has been founded by the Romans and has thrived on seeing this day even centuries after.  

 

The city of London is the ancient center of London but is really the smallest city in England. The London that we have acquainted with covers a much wider metropolitan area and is home to nearly 9 million people. With a number of the world’s best artwork, entertainment, dining, shopping, and history, it is impossible to be bored in London.

 

Additionally, there are plenty of kid-friendly areas to visit in London. Get up close and personal with underwater creatures at SEALIFE London Aquarium or even learn more about the Science Museum, London’s interactive hub of science and technology. Both are ideal for fun family days out. You only have to land and call in the services of airport transfers UK.

 

Edinburgh

 

One of Scotland’s popular because of its most well-preserved historic buildings, Edinburgh is perhaps best known as the home of the Royal Edinburgh Castle.  

 

The Scottish capital isn’t known as “the Athens of the North” for nothing. The surrounding rocky landscape and especially Arthur’s Seat — a volcano, fortunately dormant– make it a prime spot for urban exploration, with twisting alleys, hill-top landmarks, and all that surrounding woodland producing picture-postcard views everywhere you turn.  

 

You likely know Edinburgh as home to the Fringe, the world’s largest arts festival. For three weeks each August, this citywide mega-jamboree entails thousands of drama, stand-up, live music, and literary events cropping up throughout town.   

 

Moreover, there aren’t many cities that boast an extinct volcano, however, Edinburgh manages to squeeze a few of these into two miles. Arthur’s Seat is visible in much of the center since it climbs from the broad grasslands of Holyrood Park. 

 

Enthusiasts of art should visit The National Art Gallery of Scotland on Princes Street, or the Gallery of Modern Art a Couple of Minutes away from the West End. For shopping, visit Princes Street, also for a bite to eat, stop off in New Town, a gorgeous Georgian area of the town, where there are lots of great pubs and restaurants.   

 

Salisbury

 

Historically a center of the cloth and textile business, Salisbury-the county town of Wiltshire-lies in between Rivers Nadder and the Bourne as it flows down to the Avon.  

 

On getting royal permission for hosting a market, a bridge was built across the Avon in 1244, thus creating perfect conditions for Salisbury to turn into a significant trading center. Moreover, Salisbury Cathedral remains one of the most visited religious sites in England.   

 

Among the world’s oldest world heritage sites, Stonehenge has been a place of pilgrimage for more than 4,500 decades. On Salisbury plain in England, Stonehenge is among the most recognizable monuments of the Neolithic planet and one of the hottest, with more than one million people per year. British airport riders say that this is the most common place their passengers ask them to drive to.

 

Windsor

 

Windsor is inevitably a tourist magnet, but this is one of the places worth stopping off at if you’re taking in London’s finest attractions and restaurants too. To get a flavor of the large life, choose an elegant carriage ride through Windsor’s stunning Grand Park. With 5,000 acres to explore on foot, by bicycle, or on horseback, you’ll have much to do here. There are formal gardens, grassland, and ancient oaks from the famous woods for a picnic space.  

 

York Minster

 

York Minster is among the planet’s most magnificent cathedrals, a paradise vision in the world crafted in stained glass and stone. For a millennium, people have been drawn to the sacred place, but its own story goes back 2,000 years to the birth of modern-day Christianity in Roman York. Explore its history, join a service or enjoy the space.

 

It’s a stunning building to visit. You can even explore its under-croft or climb the high central tower for several magnificent views. Additionally, your entry ticket is valid for a full year from your very first trip as soon as you get off from your taxi airport UK.

 

Clifford’s Tower

 

Clifford’s Tower is very central in York and located between the Castle Museum and the Jorvik Viking Centre. It is looked after by English Heritage so will probably be included in case you’ve got an English Heritage card.   

 

The magnificent panoramic views over Old York at the top of Clifford’s Tower are certainly a commendable starting point for any trip. There’s a lot to discover at this imposing Tower standing proud of its own high mound. While this is almost all that remains of the famous and renowned York Castle that was built by William the Conqueror, it did serve as a prison and a royal mint at its time.

 

The Shambles

 

One of the best-preserved medieval retail hub offering shopping streets in Europe, The Shambles is another stop that’s necessary to make. Though none of the first shop-fronts has survived medieval times, some possessions still have outside wooden shelves, reminders of if cuts of meat have been served from the open windows.

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